Spurts of Consciousness & Obsessions

Besides black coffee, of course.

CollegeHumor has been occupying my free moments who are not being occupied by my paper on the Nazi occupation of France in relation to the corporate occupation of America. Am I really writing one of my final papers in the university based on politics? Perhaps social politics and cultural aspects, but politics nonetheless joins in the mix… Wow. Speaking of conspiracies, these guys are genius:

That’s like this guy’s “blunder.” Could it truly be coined domestic terrorism?

Speaking of 9/11… I no longer hold an opinion on the happenings of 9/11. Once I met conspiracy theorists I became pretty apathetic about it all after seeing the hype generated. It’s bullshit in any sense of it, and by discussing it I just keep empowering the fear surrounding it: real or conspirical, the fear exists. Where’s the third option in our society? More of that to come….

This article at Not Exactly Rocket Science relates the meta-self to a camera lens through a study which I found very interesting:

First, he recruited 106 students and asked half of them to pose for a picture. They were told that the other group would rate how attractive they were in either a day or a month. They had to predict those ratings, and write a brief description of how they’d be perceived. In reality, all the judges gave their scores there and then. Epley reckoned that people would be better at predicting how others would judge them in the far future than in the immediate one, because we think about things in the distant future using a broad, high-level perspective – the same lens that others view us through.

Sure enough, the posers were significantly better at predicting the judges’ marks if they thought they were being rated in a month than in a day. The descriptions also supported his explanation. When the posers had to think how they’d be perceived tomorrow, they mentioned specific traits such as “hair tied in ponytail” or “looks tired”. If they had to read the mind of a judge one month in the future, they mentioned general details like “Asian” or “wears glasses”. These are the same sorts of comments that the judges themselves wrote in their descriptions.

A second similar study found the same trends when students had to record a description of themselves for a few minutes. Again, they were told that a listener would use the recording to form an overall impression of them, either later that day or several months from now. And again, they were better at predicting the judges’ actual scores if they were casting their mind into the future.

At first, this trick of looking at yourself through a less, detailed lens might seem a bit like another typical strategy used by would-be mind-readers – putting yourself in other people’s shoes. But that’s not what’s at work here – in these experiments, people are very unlikely to know that other people are using different perspective to their own. Indeed, other studies have found that people aren’t that good at taking someone else’s perspective and the strategy has little value in terms of understanding how others see us.

Maybe I’ll find myself a new lens and get over myself. I’ve been trying so hard to focus my lens I realise I’m too close to see at times. Interjection by Jason Cruz lyrics: sometimes you get too close to see a different side of what life could be, and if you stare too long it all becomes a blur, and its easy to forget just who we are. Don’t stare to hard, just take a look around. Simple simple simple yet so powerful. In a world full of mirrors a reflection is all you see. We’ll save my favorite quote from my punk days for next time.

And of course, among all this introspective contemplation, I find ameta-internet video! I’m so inspired:

I swear, I’m going to rename this blog “Daily Synchronicity.” My eyes hurt after Avatar and its 3D glasses, and I questioned why we’d go see 3D movies often. Then I see that they’re debating making television in 3D. Oh, wow.

One too many TED talks going on in my life right now, so we’ll leave it with one I haven’t watched. But how fucking cool that WordPress has TED tags now:

I’d like to think that science will never be able to find consciousness in brains, though after that DMT research I think that this proves the physical aspect of our connection to a collective consciousness. I no longer believe in imagination, or coincidences. And life is freaky. More on that to come…

Talking to a friend, we discussed the parallels between experienced business gurus and their younger employees and the same exact situation in science. We are youth, we truly are the future. We make change, no one else. We embrace.

Freud’s nephew was the guy we can blame for fucking shit up with consumer culture. Wow, carpe diem is a big mystery? Living in the moment is truly so shocking?. I’ll never understand, though I’ll never deny my involvement in it, either…

One more CollegeHumor vid, since I’m finally having sex (oh yeah, I think I met a soulmate. Is that too personal to blog about?):

I’m officially all up in Twitter since I like, deleted my like, Facebook, like. Follow me or something, you three.

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jayurbzz


Another twenty some odd young adult who believes he sees things from a unique perspective. Here be my poetry & prose, short stories, favored school papers, rantings, and "blogs." Comment, critique, and profit.


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